• Posted on January 16, 2019 3:30 am
    By Tacoma
    Tacoma
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    Teeth Whitening

    Know about the whitening agents There are various agents like whitening toothpaste, tooth whitening strips, whitening pens and teeth whitening custom trays. All of these can be self-applied with a prescription and direction of your dentist. The other types of teeth whitening agents are used in a dental office by professionals. The main ingredient of most whitening agents is hydrogen peroxide which reacts with the minerals in the tooth and liberates oxygen. This lightens the hue of teeth. The types of tooth whitening There are two types of tooth whitening techniques that are known as intrinsic and extrinsic. Intrinsic tooth whitening ‘Intrinsic’ refers to whitening the inner part of the tooth, which soaks up hydrogen peroxide gel (also called whitening gel or bleach) and becomes lighter. This is mainly done for teeth which have suffered injury or trauma and have undergone cell death. When the inner part of the tooth is whitened, the colour is reflected through the outer layer of enamel on  your teeth, making the teeth look brighter Extrinsic tooth whitening In extrinsic teeth whitening, the surfaces of teeth are cleaned of all the stains, debris and tartar present. Then the surfaces are treated with various chemical or mechanical agents. Followed by this, the bleaching agent is applied. Tooth bleaching or whitening may require several appointments. Your dentist will guide you with the appointments and the aftercare required. It is important to know that tooth whitening may have temporary results and you may have to revisit your dentist for long-lasting results. Other than that, it is a completely safe, health-restoring procedure that dentists recommend. Do’s and don’ts after a tooth whitening procedure: Once you’ve completed a whitening treatment, there are a few steps you can take to maintain your whiter smile: Quit smoking  Smoking tobacco can cause discolouration of teeth. Eliminating tobacco can help keep your teeth healthy and bright. Avoid stain-causing foods and beverages  Coffee, tea, wine, sports drinks, hard candy, berries and tomato sauce are all foods that can cause tooth discolouration. Avoid too much of these foods and beverages in order to maintain the white color of your teeth. Use a straw  While drinking beverages, try to use a straw. This will keep stain-causing dyes away from your teeth. If you are thinking of getting a teeth whitening done, consult with the Tacoma Dental Group for a personalized experience, specific to your dental condition. Brighten up those pearly whites and boost your confidence! For more information on teeth whitenings, consult Dr Ron Lo at (253)383-1551 or tacomadentalgroup@gmail.com  You can also visit our website https://tacomadentalgroup.com/  for more information.

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  • Posted on December 12, 2018 7:16 am
    By Tacoma
    Tacoma
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    Teeth Whitening

    Every person has a smile that is unique to them. This can be in regard to the type of teeth, the arrangement of teeth or even the colour. We often think about why some people’s teeth look less bright or yellower than others. A  yellowish hue could be due to internal or external factors. Teeth are made up of enamel and dentin that comprise the outer layers, along with an inner part called the pulp. The enamel and dentin contribute to the colour of teeth. The enamel is pearly white in colour, while the dentin is yellowish-white in colour. The changes in the colour of enamel could be internal or external. Internal changes in colour can be due to the ageing of teeth, falls or trauma to teeth, or medications like tetracycline. External changes occur due to smoking or tobacco products and excessive intake of tea or caffeine. Thus, tooth whitening has gained much popularity in recent years. An array of tooth whitening techniques are now commonly accessible and it can be done in the dentist office or at home. Here are 5 reasons why you should get teeth whitening done! Have younger looking teeth As our age advances, various changes occur in our body. Some of these changes can affect the teeth, such as the enamel of teeth getting worn and exposing inner layers of enamel or even dentin. This can cause tooth of dental problems like discoloration or sensitivity. Teeth whitening is a great way of reversing the effects of aging and get your bright and healthy smile back.  Prepare for any occasion Today’s men and women pay attention to the details of their looks. This goes for special occasions like parties, birthdays, anniversaries or weddings. It is a common custom to get nails and hair done before such special days, why not include your smile too? Teeth whitening can reduce the yellow discoloration and help provide you with a perfect smile to look your best. Better self-esteem Your teeth and your smile contribute to your self-confidence. They are displayed whenever you speak or interact with others.  If your teeth are in good condition, you need not to worry or be them. A study done at Marymount University even showed that there was a higher chance of getting a job if an applicant had a brighter smile than the rest. Teeth whitening can lower your inhibitions and make you confident in an interview. Restore health When a tooth suffers trauma due to falls or accidents, the cells present in the tooth can die and make the tooth look yellow or black in colour. This further makes the tooth brittle and can pose the risk of the tooth chipping. Thus, some teeth will teeth require root canal therapy followed by filling and internal tooth whitening. A teeth whitening procedure can help restore the health of your teeth. Freedom of  food choice If your diet consists of more coffee, tea, or wine, your teeth may have been stained over the years. Teeth whitening can counter stains from certain foods and help keep your smile bright. Rather than giving up the food and beverages you love, it is far easier to get a regular teeth whitening procedure! Before you go for any type of tooth whitening procedure, it is necessary that you understand the type of discoloration your teeth have. For this, you need to visit your dentist and he/she will determine the cause and guide you through the type of treatment required. If the staining is superficial, you may not need a whitening treatment. A session of professional cleaning will solve your problem. Superficial staining can be caused by tea, coffee or tobacco products. If you are thinking of getting a teeth whitening done, consult with the Tacoma Dental Group for a personalized experience, specific to your dental condition. Brighten up those pearly whites and boost your confidence! For more information on teeth whitenings, consult Dr. Ron Lo at (253)-383-1551 or at tacomadentalgroup@gmail.com  You can also visit our website https://tacomadentalgroup.com/  for more information.

    Dental care
  • Posted on May 4, 2017 10:15 am
    Dr. Ron Lo DDS
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    blog-765

    While many people are now aware that smoking can adversely affect their health, some do not know that smoking can also adversely affect their oral health? Many do not recognize that smoking can result in tooth staining, gum disease, tooth loss, and in more severe cases, mouth cancer? The statistics on the dental health of smokers is not positive! About 16 percent of people who smoke have poor dental health, four times the rate of people who have never smoked. Smokers are less likely to have gone to the dentist in the past five years than non-smokers. Also, more than a third of smokers have at least three dental health issues. So, in this article, we’ll talk about how smoking affects your teeth and oral health...Here are some of the ways… Bad breath: Also called halitosis or smoker’s breath, the most immediate way that smoking causes bad breath is by leaving smoke particles in the throat and lungs. Also, the chemicals in tobacco smoke can remain in the mouth, leading to a host of secondary causes of bad breath. Tobacco causes chronic bad breath by drying out the mouth and palate, leaving a dry, chemical-filled environment, where anerobic oral bacteria run amok. Periodontal (Gum) disease: Studies have found that tobacco use is one of the biggest risk factors in the development of periodontal disease. The latter is a gum infection, which destroys soft tissue and bone that anchor your teeth to your jawbone. In early stages, your gums may bleed when you brush or floss. Also, smokers have more calculus (tartar) than non-smokers, which may result in a decreased flow of saliva. Calculus is the hardened form of plaque. As your gum infection worsens, your gums begin to break down. They pull away from your teeth, forming pockets. Later, more supporting structures are destroyed, and the pockets deepen. Tooth discoloration: This is one of the effects of smoking on your teeth, and is due to the nicotine and tar in the tobacco. Nicotine by itself is a colorless substance, but when mixed with oxygen, it turns yellow and can make your teeth yellow in a very short time. Heavy smokers complain that their teeth are almost brown after years of smoking. Inflammation of the salivary gland openings on the roof of the mouth: While smoking immediately stimulates saliva flow, it also predisposes to inflammation and infection of the salivary glands in the mouth. It blocks off and damages the salivary glands, resulting in mouth dryness. It also slightly reduces the pH of the mouth, thereby making the mouth more acidic and predisposing to tooth decay and dental erosion. Increased build-up of plaque and tartar on the teeth: Tartar, sometimes called calculus, is plaque that has hardened on your teeth. Smoking results in an increased build-up of tartar. Tartar can also form at or underneath the gumline and can irritate gum tissues. Tartar gives plaque more surface area on which to grow and a much stickier surface to adhere to, resulting in more serious conditions, such as cavities and gum disease. Increased loss of bone within the jaw: Studies have shown a direct link between tobacco use and reduced bone density. This may result in an increased loss of bone within the jaw, resulting in loose teeth at risk of displacement. Increased risk of leukoplakia, or white patches within the mouth: Smoking is one of the causes of Leukoplakia. The condition is usually painless, but is closely linked to an increased risk of oral cancer. Leukoplakia most commonly occurs on the tongue, but can also occur on the floor of the mouth, on the soft palate, on the inside of the cheek, on the lower lips, and on the gums. Tooth loss: According to the Academy of General Dentistry, men who smoke lose 2.9 teeth for every 10 years of smoking. For women, the number is 1.5 teeth per decade of smoking. Smokers are about twice as likely to lose their teeth as non-smokers. One theory is that tooth loss in smokers occurs because tobacco restricts the flow of blood to the gum tissues, which limits the nutrients necessary for the bone and periodontal support for the teeth. Another theory is that a chain of events causes tooth loss. This starts with plaque and tartar build-up on teeth, which can cause gingivitis, which leads to periodontal disease, and eventually, tooth loss. Delayed healing process following tooth extraction, periodontal treatment, dental implants, or oral surgery: There are several reasons why smoking results in a delayed healing process following dental implants, tooth extraction, or oral surgery. One such reason is that nicotine and its by-products affect peripheral blood vessels, especially the superficial ones in the mouth and skin. This results in less blood flow to the areas that these vessels supply. This affects both healing and immune mechanisms. Mouth dryness also promotes increased growth of disease-causing bacteria, which increases the incidence and severity of periodontal disease. All of this delays healing. Increased risk of developing oral cancer: This risk of oral cancer is about 5 to 10 times greater among smokers compared to people who never smoked. Some of the chemicals contained in tobacco smoke cause, initiate, or promote cancer. These chemicals cause genetic changes in cells of the mouth cavity, which can lead to the development of oral cancer. So, now you know more about how smoking can adversely affect your oral health. If you are a smoker, consider a smoking cessation plan, or try reducing it in phases. Also, consult your dentist, who can examine you for the early signs of periodontal disease and oral cancer. For more information on how you can schedule an appointment for a thorough dental check-up, contact Dr. Ron Lo at 253-383-1551 or at tacomadentalgroup@gmail.com.

    Dental care